U.K. Archeology: Rail Upgrade Work Unearths 172-Year-Old Siding In Huddersfield

A railway siding dating back to the Victorian era has been unearthed by engineers upgrading a train route.

The siding at Hillhouse in Huddersfield was used for harbouring off-duty trains and was built about 172 years ago.

It included train sheds and railway turntables for services transporting cattle, coal and other materials across the country, according to Network Rail.

The siding was discovered by workers on the Transpennine upgrade scheme who are preparing the route for more tracks.

Network Rail workers have spent three months uncovering the site near Alder Street and archaeologists said the foundations of the old sidings were buried close to the surface.

Hannah Lomas, principal programme sponsor at Network Rail, said: “This is an amazing insight into what the siding would have looked like over a century ago.”

Kevin Moon, project manager at Archaeological Services WYAS, said the discovery provided “valuable information on the early development of the railway system in Huddersfield”.

The route is being made ready for twice as many tracks in the future for faster and more frequent trains, a Network Rail spokesperson said.

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